fairness doctrine

A study of the policies of the Federal Communications Commission designed to guide broadcasters in taking editorial positions, and reactions of broadcasters to the policies. by James Savage McElhaney

Written in English
Published: Pages: 110 Downloads: 118
Share This

Subjects:

  • United States. -- Federal Communication Commission.,
  • Radio -- Law and legislation.,
  • Radio journalism.
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 110 l.
Number of Pages110
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16762552M

  No special rules, like the fairness doctrine, to second-guess you. No so-called equal time law. No content rules beyond those for obscenity, indecency, defamation and the like.''. The fairness doctrine of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC), introduced in , was a policy that required the holders of broadcast licenses both to present controversial issues of public importance and to do so in a manner that was—in the FCC’s view—honest, equitable, and balanced. The FCC eliminated the policy in and removed the rule that implemented the.   The Fairness Doctrine arose from a unique democratic crisis: the sudden appearance of mass media in the form of radio. The framers of the Constitution simply never envisioned that .   The Fairness Doctrine is an old Federal Communications Commission regulation that required all political opinion broadcast on the public airwaves to .

  Reinstate the Fairness Doctrine for social media There used to be a rule called The Fairness Doctrine that the FCC put in place to regulate companies with public broadcast licenses. The Fairness Doctrine stated that broadcasters should present controversial issues of public importance in a fair and balanced way.   When Medgar Evers tried to win air time on WLBT in the s and early s, he had on his side the Fairness Doctrine. This FCC policy directed broadcasters to present programs on controversial public issues and enable those who disagreed to present their opinions on the air. Evers sent his complaints to the FCC, which took little action. The fairness doctrine was not a statute, but a set of rules and regulations that imposed controls on the content of the broadcasting media. It viewed radio and television as not merely industries but servants of the public interest.   The fairness doctrine was a longstanding, if seldom enforced, regulation that required broadcasters using the public airwaves to present contrasting viewpoints on controversial issues.

The fairness doctrine was overturned by the FCC in The FCC discarded the rule because, contrary to its purpose, it failed to encourage the discussion of more controversial issues. There were also concerns that it was in violation of First Amendment free speech principles. The fairness doctrine brings together such strange bedfellows as Phyllis Schlafly and Ralph Nader; and it does so, according to some experts, because the basic philosophical question of what. The Fairness Doctrine Essay Words | 4 Pages. The United States Federal Communications Commission, also known as the FCC, introduced the Fairness Doctrine to make broadcasters report controversial issues of public importance in a manner that was equally balanced, honest, and fair.   The Fairness Doctrine was instituted in that required holders of broadcast licenses to present controversial issues in an equitable, balanced and honest manner. The Federal Communications.

fairness doctrine by James Savage McElhaney Download PDF EPUB FB2

The fairness doctrine of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC), introduced inwas a policy that required the holders of broadcast licenses to both present controversial issues of public importance and to do so in a manner that was—in the FCC's view—honest, equitable, and balanced.

The FCC eliminated the policy in and removed the rule that implemented the. Simmons' book gives an in-depth look to the rising opposition to the Fairness Doctrine. The information in this book is easily accessible through different outlets (whether it be a wikipedia search or a media law textbook).

However, what this book offers that those don't is bias.4/4(1). Fairness doctrine, U.S. communications policy (–87) formulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that required licensed radio and television broadcasters to present fair and balanced coverage of controversial issues of interest to their communities, including by devoting equal airtime to opposing points of view.

The origins of the fairness doctrine lay in the Radio Act. The Fairness Doctrine only applied to broadcast licenses. The report by the Congressional Research Service notes that broadcast is "distinct. Inthe FCC panel repealed the Fairness Doctrine altogether with a vote.

Congress has regularly tried to bring the doctrine back ever since. Reagan and George H.W. Bush both quashed Congressional initiatives by threatening vetoes, and a attempt to reinstate the doctrine didn't make it out of committee.

The fairness doctrine was a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) policy. The FCC believed that broadcast licenses (required for both radio and terrestrial TV stations) were a form of public trust and, as such, licensees should provide balanced and fair coverage of controversial issues.

"Bill Clinton Talks of Re-Imposing Fairness Doctrine or At Least ‘More Balance’ in Media," Broadcasting & Cable, 13 Feb. Eggerton, John. "Obama Does Not Support Return of Fairness. The Fairness Doctrine and 83 other "outdated and obsolete media-related rules" were tossed Monday into the regulatory dust bin of the Federal.

H.R. To amend the Communications Act of to reinstate the obligation of broadcast licensees to afford reasonable opportunity for the discussion of conflicting views on issues of public importance (commonly known as the "Fairness Doctrine").

Ina database of bills in the U.S. Congress. The fairness doctrine's constitutionality was tested and upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in a landmark case, Red Lion Broadcasting v. FCC ( U.S.

Although the Court then ruled that. The Fairness Doctrine was a policy of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) that required broadcast licensees to cover issues of public importance and to do so in a fair manner.

Issues of public importance were not limited to political campaigns. Nuclear plant construction, workers’ rights, and other issues of focus for a Cited by: 3.

Sinclair could even put the Fairness Doctrine back in play, a rule established in to require that the networks—all three of them—air all sides of issues. The doctrine was abandoned in the s with the proliferation of cable, leaving citizens with little recourse over broadcasters that misuse the public airwaves, except to oppose the renewal of licenses.

However, the Fairness Doctrine is different from the Equal Time rule, While the FCC has not enforced the rule in nearly a quarter century, it remains technically on the books. Inthe year the fairness doctrine was abolished, the U.S. broadcast market had grown to include “more than 1, television stations and more t radio stations,” and “radio.

Professor Thomas Krattenmaker of Georgetown testifies before the Senate Commerce Committee on a proposed law repealing the Fairness Doctrine. He argues that proponents of the Fairness Doctrine. Fairness Doctrine: Selected full-text books and articles. Free Expression in America: A Documentary History By Sheila Suess Kennedy Greenwood Press, Librarian's tip: "Document The Fairness Doctrine, " p.

PS PRIMARY SOURCE A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a. The Fairness Doctrine was a FCC rule that required station owners to broadcast “honest, equitable, and balanced programming”. This replaced a rule called “The Mayflower Doctrine” which required broadcasters to “provide full and equal opportunity for the presentation to the public of all sides of public issues.”.

Fairness Doctrine. The Fairness Doctrine is a former policy of the United States's Federal Communications Commission. It required broadcast licensees to present controversial issues of public importance, and to present such issues in an honest, equal and balanced manner.

The Fairness Doctrine is a code of broadcast behavior, distilled from 50 years of legislation, court decisions and F.C.C. practice, and defined not so much by what it is as by what it does. Fairness Doctrine: History and Constitutional Issues Congressional Research Service Summary The Fairness Doctrine was a policy of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) that required broadcast licensees to cover issues of public importance and to do so in a fair manner.

The Fairness Doctrine was a policy promulgated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) that required broadcast licensees to cover issues of public importance and to do so in a fair manner.

In practice, it required broadcasters to identify issues of public importance, decide to cover those issues, and then to afford the best representatives of the opposing views on the. In fact, not one Fairness Doctrine decision issued by the FCC had ever concerned itself with talkshows.

Indeed, the talkshow format was born and flourished while the doctrine was in operation. “The Fairness Doctrine is a relic of an earlier era when government officials thought they knew best what news and information the American people wanted and needed,” representatives Fred Upton and Greg Waldon wrote today in a statement.

“The FCC has finally done what it should have done 20 years ago: It has scrapped the Fairness Doctrine. The Fairness Doctrine applied only to broadcast licensees, and as a cable television channel, Fox News would in all likelihood never have been constrained by the doctrine's requirement to.

The Fairness Doctrine was a policy of the United States Federal Communications Commission that was initially instituted in When it was an active policy, it had two basic elements to it. It required those who held a broadcast license to develop content in the good of the public interest for local controversial matters.

Fairness doctrine definition is - a tenet of licensed broadcasting that ensures a reasonable opportunity for the airing of conflicting viewpoints on controversial issues.

Twenty-five years ago, the FCC ended the “Fairness Doctrine,” which in the name of "fairness" infringed on the freedom of speech of broadcast media. By Bruce Walker. The Fairness Doctrine is the long defunct federal rule that required broadcasters to present contrasting views on controversial issues.

Off the books sinceits demise is often (and erroneously) credited with the rise of Rush Limbaugh and the rest of the noise machine. circuit remanded a Fairness Doctrine case to the agency. congress immediately attempted to reinstate the Doctrine – but that effort was vetoed by President ronald reagan.

the Fairness Doctrine has now been off the books for more than two decades, though the question of whether it should be restored has flared up in the press and on capitol Hill. On June 8, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chair Julius Genachowski agreed to wipe the Fairness Doctrine completely off the agency's books, even though the rule has been officially dead since House Republicans have long pushed to get the Doctrine off the rule books for good, and they've finally gotten their way.

From the time it was put in place in until its. On June 8, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chair Julius Genachowski agreed to wipe the Fairness Doctrine completely off the agency's books, even though the rule has been officially dead since House Republicans have long pushed to get the Doctrine off the rule books for good, and they've finally gotten their way.

From the time it was put in place in until its demise .Fixing the Fairness Doctrine - A modest technology proposal Writer and Blogger Mike Wallach offers a topical commentary on the Fairness Doctrine. Thanks. Pgrote30 December (UTC) Pre-Fairness Doctrine. An interesting paragraph on what came before the Fairness Doctrine has been temporarily removed so it can be sourced.

Expert Opinion Fundamental Fairness Involves More Than Due Process Here in Connecticut, the fundamental fairness doctrine not only overlaps, but may also transcend, due process.